We Can't Believe It!

We want to believe it, but we just can't
The future is now!!
There are so many great projects going on in the universe. As far as innovation hubs go, I would say MIT is up there - they are working on some of the best, dudes.
One project that I came across, and was dazzled by, is a project that Professor William T. Freeman, Michael Rubinstein and their team of over-achievers have been working on over in Beantown.
They’ve created an amplification process, called Eulerian Video Magnification, which is a way through which one can see tiny movements otherwise imperceptible to the human eye, with video. Detecting miniscule changes in color, suddenly an everyday scene is pulsing and alive with new details.
“Once we amplify these small motions, there’s like a whole new world you can look at,” Professor Freeman said.
Originally intended and conceived for the monitoring of neonatal babies without making physical contact, this can work on just about anything. One of its strengths is its ability to detect a pulse visually, but it can also pick-up on the changing hue of the sky or the slightest malfunction in a piece of machinery.
The team has released the code to the public (to use for fun not for dough!) and I can’t wait to see what people use it for. 
Read More Here
jw

The future is now!!

There are so many great projects going on in the universe. As far as innovation hubs go, I would say MIT is up there - they are working on some of the best, dudes.

One project that I came across, and was dazzled by, is a project that Professor William T. Freeman, Michael Rubinstein and their team of over-achievers have been working on over in Beantown.

They’ve created an amplification process, called Eulerian Video Magnification, which is a way through which one can see tiny movements otherwise imperceptible to the human eye, with video. Detecting miniscule changes in color, suddenly an everyday scene is pulsing and alive with new details.

“Once we amplify these small motions, there’s like a whole new world you can look at,” Professor Freeman said.

Originally intended and conceived for the monitoring of neonatal babies without making physical contact, this can work on just about anything. One of its strengths is its ability to detect a pulse visually, but it can also pick-up on the changing hue of the sky or the slightest malfunction in a piece of machinery.

The team has released the code to the public (to use for fun not for dough!) and I can’t wait to see what people use it for. 

Read More Here

jw